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Saturday, October 21, 2017

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With...Susan Fowler: She’s 26, and Brought Down Uber’s C.E.O. What’s Next?  
In her first interview since the essay that started a wave of sexual-harassment revelations, Susan Fowler tells her life story and looks to the future.  

Ex-Presidents and Trump Show Unity at Hurricane Benefit Concert  
The concert is part of a fund-raising campaign, One America Appeal, aimed at assisting hurricane recovery efforts.  

Undocumented 17-Year-Old Must Delay Abortion, Court Rules  
The ruling, which gave the federal government 11 days to find a sponsor to take custody of the teenager, could put her health at risk, doctors said.  

Cancer Didn’t Kill Pablo Neruda, Panel Finds. Was it Murder?  
Six years after Pablo Neruda’s driver claimed the Nobel laureate was poisoned, forensic experts agree on one fact: His death certificate was wrong.  

News Analysis: Political Guardrails Gone, a President’s Somber Duty Skids Into Spectacle  
The weeklong feud between President Trump and a Democratic congresswoman after a soldier’s death might never have happened had either side followed convention.  

Letters: Teenagers’ View of the News  
We asked high school students to react to a recent Times article and got over 1,000 responses. Here are 20 of our favorites.  

N.A.A.C.P., Seeking a New Voice, Names Derrick Johnson as President  
With a pair of major announcements on Saturday, the century-old organization moved to reclaim its role as the nation’s pre-eminent voice on civil rights.  

Spain Will Remove Catalonia Leader, Escalating Secession Crisis  
Mariano Rajoy, in an unexpectedly forceful move, said Madrid would take control of the independence-minded region, pushing out its separatist administration.  

Brutal Killing of Journalist Exposes ‘Something Darker’ in Malta  
Daphne Caruana Galizia enraged dozens of powerful people with investigations that exposed corruption. Virtually nobody expects her killing to be solved.  

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Famous Athletes Have Always Led the Way  
The extraordinary are the ones who need to make things better for everyone.  

Opinion: Black Lives Matter Is Democracy in Action  
A decentralized movement can be effective, even without a Martin Luther King Jr.  

Trump Says He Will Release Final Set of Documents on Kennedy Assassination  
A 1992 law that sought to quell conspiracy theories about the killing mandated the release of the secret documents by Oct. 26 of this year.  

Iran Saps Strength of Revolutionary Guards With Arrests and Cutbacks  
The elite military group drove the Iranian economy at the peak of the sanctions era. Now, seen as a drag on growth, it is under attack by President Hassan Rouhani.  

Opinion: A Male Infertility Crisis Is Coming. The Middle East Can Help.  
The region has made huge progress in viewing the condition as a medical problem, not a manhood problem.  

Loose Ends: Well, Actually, Frankenstein Was the Name of the Doctor  
Scary facts only special people know.  

Op-Ed Columnist: Jimmy Carter Lusts for a Trump Posting  
Puritanical Democratic former president seeks job with louche Republican current president — but just to save the world.  

Op-Ed Columnist: The Democrats in Their Labyrinth  
A party that will do anything to beat Trump except try to woo his voters.  

O’Reilly Settled New Harassment Claims, Then Fox Renewed His Contract  
In January, the Fox News host was said to have agreed to a $32 million settlement with a former network analyst, the largest of his known payouts.  

Memoir of Growing Up Fat Forces France to Look in the Mirror  
Gabrielle Deydier’s plaintive account and sociological study exposes the many ways the obese face censure and insensitivity.  

Article 155: The ‘Nuclear Option’ That Could Let Spain Seize Catalonia  
After Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy held a cabinet meeting Saturday, he announced a decision to oust the Catalan leader and to call new elections in the independence-minded region.  

Trump Rules: Why Has the E.P.A. Shifted on Toxic Chemicals? An Industry Insider Helps Call the Shots  
A scientist who worked for the chemical industry now shapes policy on hazardous chemicals. Within the E.P.A., there is fear that public health is at risk. (At right, a signing ceremony for new rules on toxic chemicals.)  

The E.P.A.’s Top 10 Toxic Threats, and Industry’s Pushback  
The Environmental Protection Agency published toxic chemicals it will evaluate first under a new law. Here is a look at those chemicals, how they are used and the health threats.  

Fine Arts & Exhibits: Art Lurks in an Unlikely Place for Mary Kelly: the Dryer  
The conceptual artist has her first New York gallery show in five years, featuring politically loaded artwork made out of compressed lint.  

Once So Chic and Swooshy, Freeways Are Falling Out of Favor  
Several cities face pressure to tear down the 1960s-era mega-roads and reinstate pedestrian-friendly streets. Jane Jacobs told you so!  

The Look: Traveling Across Japan  
Hiroyuki Ito, a photographer who grew up in Tokyo, wanted to see more of his country. So he spent two months this summer documenting interesting moments.  

10 Minutes. 12 Gunfire Bursts. 30 Videos. Mapping the Las Vegas Massacre.  
The shots began at 10:05. Twelve bursts of gunfire later, police broke down Stephen Paddock’s door at the Mandalay Bay. The Times mapped 30 videos to draw perhaps the most complete picture to date of what happened.  

In China’s Coal Capital, Xi Jinping’s Dream Remains Elusive  
Mr. Xi has promised a new “China dream” of prosperity. But in the nation’s hinterlands, locals say there’s a stark disconnect between the bright promises and their hardscrabble reality.  

Japan Ranks Low in Female Lawmakers. An Election Won’t Change That.  
Fewer than one in five of the 1,180 candidates running in Sunday’s election for the lower house of parliament are women.  

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Why We Don’t Vote With Our Wallets  
Company boycotts are one of the few concrete ways we have to protest unethical corporate behavior.  

Opinion: To Complain Is to Truly Be Alive  
Being a person is terrible. And griping about it is the purest, most soothing form of protest there is.  

After Video Refutes Kelly’s Charges, Congresswoman Raises Issue of Race  
Representative Frederica S. Wilson said John F. Kelly, the president’s chief of staff, lied by suggesting she had taken credit for obtaining funding for a federal building in Miami.  

Readers React: Military Members and Their Families Respond to John Kelly’s News Conference  
Despite the common connection, their reactions to Mr. Kelly’s speech were anything but unanimous: Some deplored his defense of the administration, while others insisted he was speaking as a true military man.  

Don’t Get Too Comfortable at That Desk  
New designs are partly a backlash to wide-open floor plans and include a “palette of places,” meaning that people don’t sit in just one spot.  

Trilobites: Meet the Overcompensators, Plants That Get Tougher and Meaner When Attacked  
Damaging some plants sets off a molecular chain of events that causes them to grow back bigger and produce more seeds and chemical defenses simultaneously.  

Mind: How Fiction Becomes Fact on Social Media  
Platforms like Facebook and Twitter offer up memes designed to feel real, if only for an instant — long enough for our minds to make a false connection.  

Playlist: The Playlist: Taylor Swift Has a Miserable Crush and 12 More New Songs  
Hear the tracks the caught our critics' attention this week, from Fever Ray, Colleen, Chris Stapleton and more.  

Review: A Case of Déjà Vu in ‘Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween’  
In this sequel that feels like a remake, all prospects for amusement are never even vaguely realized.  

Barcelona: A Global City in the Eye of a Separatist Storm  
The question of Catalan independence has proved a more complex question for those in Barcelona than for Catalans living outside the regional capital.  

A Good Appetite: Peruvian Grilled Chicken: A Spicy, Succulent Delight  
Marinated in garlic, chiles and plenty of spices, Peruvian pollo a la brasa is surprisingly easy to make at home.  

Critic’s Notebook: Not Just ‘West Side Story’: Celebrating Bernstein’s Symphonies  
In honor of Leonard Bernstein’s centennial, the New York Philharmonic is revisiting his three symphonies, which were often criticized in his lifetime.  

Dogs Pay Attention to Your Looks  
That puppy dog face your pet makes often is a reaction to your own expression, a new study finds.  

Feature: When the Revolution Came for Amy Cuddy  
As a young social psychologist, she played by the rules and won big: an influential study, a viral TED talk, a prestigious job at Harvard. Then, suddenly, the rules changed.  

Browsing: Who Doesn’t Like Being First?  
Here’s how to get a jump on next season’s trends right now.  

Inside a Secretive Group Where Women Are Branded  
A self-help organization in Albany called Nxivm has begun to unravel as members reveal disturbing practices and fears of blackmail.  

On Campus: College Advice I Wish I’d Taken  
I’m a teacher, but as an undergraduate, I was the type of mediocre student I now disdain.  

Stephen Sondheim, Theater’s Greatest Lyricist  
Lin-Manuel Miranda speaks to the man who has consistently remade the American musical over his 60-year career — and who is trying to surprise us one more time.  


With...Susan Fowler: She’s 26, and Brought Down Uber’s C.E.O. What’s Next?  
In her first interview since the essay that started a wave of sexual-harassment revelations, Susan Fowler tells her life story and looks to the future.  

Ex-Presidents and Trump Show Unity at Hurricane Benefit Concert  
The concert is part of a fund-raising campaign, One America Appeal, aimed at assisting hurricane recovery efforts.  

Undocumented 17-Year-Old Must Delay Abortion, Court Rules  
The ruling, which gave the federal government 11 days to find a sponsor to take custody of the teenager, could put her health at risk, doctors said.  

Cancer Didn’t Kill Pablo Neruda, Panel Finds. Was it Murder?  
Six years after Pablo Neruda’s driver claimed the Nobel laureate was poisoned, forensic experts agree on one fact: His death certificate was wrong.  

News Analysis: Political Guardrails Gone, a President’s Somber Duty Skids Into Spectacle  
The weeklong feud between President Trump and a Democratic congresswoman after a soldier’s death might never have happened had either side followed convention.  

Letters: Teenagers’ View of the News  
We asked high school students to react to a recent Times article and got over 1,000 responses. Here are 20 of our favorites.  

N.A.A.C.P., Seeking a New Voice, Names Derrick Johnson as President  
With a pair of major announcements on Saturday, the century-old organization moved to reclaim its role as the nation’s pre-eminent voice on civil rights.  

Spain Will Remove Catalonia Leader, Escalating Secession Crisis  
Mariano Rajoy, in an unexpectedly forceful move, said Madrid would take control of the independence-minded region, pushing out its separatist administration.  

Brutal Killing of Journalist Exposes ‘Something Darker’ in Malta  
Daphne Caruana Galizia enraged dozens of powerful people with investigations that exposed corruption. Virtually nobody expects her killing to be solved.  

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Famous Athletes Have Always Led the Way  
The extraordinary are the ones who need to make things better for everyone.  

Opinion: Black Lives Matter Is Democracy in Action  
A decentralized movement can be effective, even without a Martin Luther King Jr.  

Trump Says He Will Release Final Set of Documents on Kennedy Assassination  
A 1992 law that sought to quell conspiracy theories about the killing mandated the release of the secret documents by Oct. 26 of this year.  

Iran Saps Strength of Revolutionary Guards With Arrests and Cutbacks  
The elite military group drove the Iranian economy at the peak of the sanctions era. Now, seen as a drag on growth, it is under attack by President Hassan Rouhani.  

Opinion: A Male Infertility Crisis Is Coming. The Middle East Can Help.  
The region has made huge progress in viewing the condition as a medical problem, not a manhood problem.  

Loose Ends: Well, Actually, Frankenstein Was the Name of the Doctor  
Scary facts only special people know.  

Op-Ed Columnist: Jimmy Carter Lusts for a Trump Posting  
Puritanical Democratic former president seeks job with louche Republican current president — but just to save the world.  

Op-Ed Columnist: The Democrats in Their Labyrinth  
A party that will do anything to beat Trump except try to woo his voters.  

O’Reilly Settled New Harassment Claims, Then Fox Renewed His Contract  
In January, the Fox News host was said to have agreed to a $32 million settlement with a former network analyst, the largest of his known payouts.  

Memoir of Growing Up Fat Forces France to Look in the Mirror  
Gabrielle Deydier’s plaintive account and sociological study exposes the many ways the obese face censure and insensitivity.  

Article 155: The ‘Nuclear Option’ That Could Let Spain Seize Catalonia  
After Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy held a cabinet meeting Saturday, he announced a decision to oust the Catalan leader and to call new elections in the independence-minded region.  

Trump Rules: Why Has the E.P.A. Shifted on Toxic Chemicals? An Industry Insider Helps Call the Shots  
A scientist who worked for the chemical industry now shapes policy on hazardous chemicals. Within the E.P.A., there is fear that public health is at risk. (At right, a signing ceremony for new rules on toxic chemicals.)  

The E.P.A.’s Top 10 Toxic Threats, and Industry’s Pushback  
The Environmental Protection Agency published toxic chemicals it will evaluate first under a new law. Here is a look at those chemicals, how they are used and the health threats.  

Fine Arts & Exhibits: Art Lurks in an Unlikely Place for Mary Kelly: the Dryer  
The conceptual artist has her first New York gallery show in five years, featuring politically loaded artwork made out of compressed lint.  

Once So Chic and Swooshy, Freeways Are Falling Out of Favor  
Several cities face pressure to tear down the 1960s-era mega-roads and reinstate pedestrian-friendly streets. Jane Jacobs told you so!  

The Look: Traveling Across Japan  
Hiroyuki Ito, a photographer who grew up in Tokyo, wanted to see more of his country. So he spent two months this summer documenting interesting moments.  

10 Minutes. 12 Gunfire Bursts. 30 Videos. Mapping the Las Vegas Massacre.  
The shots began at 10:05. Twelve bursts of gunfire later, police broke down Stephen Paddock’s door at the Mandalay Bay. The Times mapped 30 videos to draw perhaps the most complete picture to date of what happened.  

In China’s Coal Capital, Xi Jinping’s Dream Remains Elusive  
Mr. Xi has promised a new “China dream” of prosperity. But in the nation’s hinterlands, locals say there’s a stark disconnect between the bright promises and their hardscrabble reality.  

Japan Ranks Low in Female Lawmakers. An Election Won’t Change That.  
Fewer than one in five of the 1,180 candidates running in Sunday’s election for the lower house of parliament are women.  

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: Why We Don’t Vote With Our Wallets  
Company boycotts are one of the few concrete ways we have to protest unethical corporate behavior.  

Opinion: To Complain Is to Truly Be Alive  
Being a person is terrible. And griping about it is the purest, most soothing form of protest there is.  

After Video Refutes Kelly’s Charges, Congresswoman Raises Issue of Race  
Representative Frederica S. Wilson said John F. Kelly, the president’s chief of staff, lied by suggesting she had taken credit for obtaining funding for a federal building in Miami.  

Readers React: Military Members and Their Families Respond to John Kelly’s News Conference  
Despite the common connection, their reactions to Mr. Kelly’s speech were anything but unanimous: Some deplored his defense of the administration, while others insisted he was speaking as a true military man.  

Don’t Get Too Comfortable at That Desk  
New designs are partly a backlash to wide-open floor plans and include a “palette of places,” meaning that people don’t sit in just one spot.  

Trilobites: Meet the Overcompensators, Plants That Get Tougher and Meaner When Attacked  
Damaging some plants sets off a molecular chain of events that causes them to grow back bigger and produce more seeds and chemical defenses simultaneously.  

Mind: How Fiction Becomes Fact on Social Media  
Platforms like Facebook and Twitter offer up memes designed to feel real, if only for an instant — long enough for our minds to make a false connection.  

Playlist: The Playlist: Taylor Swift Has a Miserable Crush and 12 More New Songs  
Hear the tracks the caught our critics' attention this week, from Fever Ray, Colleen, Chris Stapleton and more.  

Review: A Case of Déjà Vu in ‘Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween’  
In this sequel that feels like a remake, all prospects for amusement are never even vaguely realized.  

Barcelona: A Global City in the Eye of a Separatist Storm  
The question of Catalan independence has proved a more complex question for those in Barcelona than for Catalans living outside the regional capital.  

A Good Appetite: Peruvian Grilled Chicken: A Spicy, Succulent Delight  
Marinated in garlic, chiles and plenty of spices, Peruvian pollo a la brasa is surprisingly easy to make at home.  

Critic’s Notebook: Not Just ‘West Side Story’: Celebrating Bernstein’s Symphonies  
In honor of Leonard Bernstein’s centennial, the New York Philharmonic is revisiting his three symphonies, which were often criticized in his lifetime.  

Dogs Pay Attention to Your Looks  
That puppy dog face your pet makes often is a reaction to your own expression, a new study finds.  

Feature: When the Revolution Came for Amy Cuddy  
As a young social psychologist, she played by the rules and won big: an influential study, a viral TED talk, a prestigious job at Harvard. Then, suddenly, the rules changed.  

Browsing: Who Doesn’t Like Being First?  
Here’s how to get a jump on next season’s trends right now.  

Inside a Secretive Group Where Women Are Branded  
A self-help organization in Albany called Nxivm has begun to unravel as members reveal disturbing practices and fears of blackmail.  

On Campus: College Advice I Wish I’d Taken  
I’m a teacher, but as an undergraduate, I was the type of mediocre student I now disdain.  

Stephen Sondheim, Theater’s Greatest Lyricist  
Lin-Manuel Miranda speaks to the man who has consistently remade the American musical over his 60-year career — and who is trying to surprise us one more time.  

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